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  • cuttlefish
    started a topic Potatonator: small wave assasinator?

    Potatonator: small wave assasinator?

    Been looking for a solid all round groveller for a whle now.
    As I'm pushing 50 and 92-95 kgs it's not easy to find a board that ticks all the boxes.
    So I was looking at a Sweet potato in a 5-10" to 6'. Longish I know but I wanted more rail line for increased paddleability for points. Sub 6' boards also tend to have me arching my back too much when paddling which then gives me shoulder pain.
    Anyway with small waves in mind...
    Thing about small waves is there can be quite a bit of difference between small high tide waves and small low tide waves.
    Doesn't get mentioned much because boards will usually work better in fullish waves or suckier waves.
    So you've got a Dom or El feugo for when it's a bit hollower or peakier and a sweet potato for fuller slopier waves?
    What's involved in the choices?
    Rough catergories.
    1. Go wide point forward with a wider nose and have the volume under the chest to paddle in early?
    Then pull the tail in for manourveability and hold.
    Works well in the Addvances, fish.
    Makes for a great down the line board. Points and wally waves
    2. Go wide point back with a wider tail for planing area to support the surfers weight in rear footed surfing.
    Narrower nose that doesn't catch in more vertical surfing.
    Here we go...beachbreaks and shorter arcs.
    3. Wide nosed, wide tailed, short planing hulls like the mini-simmons and sweet potatoes with fins set on the rails and back to the tail to allow pivot.
    I was keen to get a sweet potato but what was holding me back was the potential for reduced paddle power around the line up.
    Now keep in mind I'm getting older and don't have the stamina I once did so I find short stubbie boards more tiring to paddle.
    Being just down the road from the points of Noosa means there's plenty of flat water paddling back up the points for me.
    While others do the walk around I find paddling better as I suffer from hip pain when I do a lot of walking.
    On one of Noosa's points it's a great wave but sometimes the middle section can fatten up and a board that can plane over the flatter sections is necessary.
    The good thing is the end section can speed up and hollow right out.
    So there's opportunity to ride a wave which is like low tide at the start then high tide through the mid-section into low tide again.
    Then I've come across the Potatonator:
    Thicker foiled nose to tail like a Sweet Potato which will support my weight when paddling and surfing.
    A more pulled in nose like a Dominator so that vertical snaps will be easy with less nose width to catch than a Sweet Potato.
    A flat rocker for planing but with enough nose flip and combined narrower width to handle some steeper drops and top turns when coming straight back down the face of the wave.
    A longer rail line and narrower planshape than the Sweet potato in the same volume) to be a better paddler across the flats/around the line up.
    A wider tail than the Dominator so that using Geoff McCoy's reasoning the surfers centralised weight will be supported by the wide planing area under foot.
    Anyway,
    Here I am looking at my local surfshop which had JS's, DHD's, MR's, Surftechs of various models, Bourtons, Super brand, Hayden shapes, Simon Anderson's.
    They feature a mix of different design elements I've mentioned above in their "hybrid" models but they still have in no way brought all the elements together that I wanted until I walked past the Firewire's and saw the 6'2" 44l Potatonator.
    Hold the phone...light bulbs exploding in my head.
    Finally someone has made what I would like to see.
    "Come home with me baby"?
    "Oh yes", she cooed back at me.
    I paid the madam off
    Snuck her home so the wife wouldn't spot my dirty little secret.
    Ride reports to follow...did I get it right?
    Last edited by cuttlefish; 02-20-2012, 07:45 PM. Reason: More thoughts.

  • cuttlefish
    replied
    Ya know Justin you would really dig a big potatonator. We've had that many of the same boards and in the same sizes and we both seem to be surfing less than before. Honestly if you go the 6'8" like I did I reckon you'd be very pleasantly suprised in how it actually combines the feel of a sweet potato and a potatonator when its that much foam. Its like my old potatonator 6'2" has been morphed with my favourite size in the sweet potato (5'10"). Kind of makes the chum Lee look like hard work to me when I want a small wave board that makes life easy when not surfing all the time just to keep ones hand in. If I sit a couple of foot from the nose and have the board level in the water it floats me just below belly button level. So its addvance/mid length float but planes so fast on a wave face and turns so easily because it has the deep double concave to help it seperate its width. Find Greg Webber's video about his new diamond on Facebook and you'll see where I'm coming from. Then you've got that planing width under the back foot ala Geof McCoy but instead of the slower loaded dome to allow the board to roll rail to rail.
    The thing about a sweet potato or a Chum Lee is they are still much shorter in a wider nosed template into a wide elliptical middle and tail so they will never paddle across the flats that great. When paddling for smaller waves the longer length board is always going to get the early advantage in a paddle battle. IE longboarders sitting outside you and already up to planing speed as they arrive to where you are paddling for a wave.
    The longer potatonator gives more paddling advantage over sweet potatoes, baked and I'd say the Chum lee too but the nice curve in the nose allows it to initiate turns that just much easier.
    Oh but they have rails that are too thick i won't be able to bury them will say those who've never ridden a McCoy or a sup (lol). Well if we are talking about small waves and having fun then the thicker rails will also reduce potential bogging and keep the board planing in turns. Use the big fins for drive and control. Anyway I don't want to say too much or every bastard might cotton on and then where will be my equalisation efforts? Nah...folks are too scared of others thinking they are a kook with a chunky longer board...my secret is safe.
    Last edited by cuttlefish; 04-30-2017, 02:40 AM.

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  • Freshiedude
    replied
    Hey Pete the Chum Lee looks across a sweet Potato/ Potatonator. Check out uk boardstore. Then let me know. Bit in this forum as well

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  • apache
    replied
    Always do "(choose) all" then "copy" before hitting "post". Gets you from 2 eaten posts out of 5 to nearly 1 out of 20. Takes no time, just a stupid reflex (in a poor forum).

    Leave a comment:


  • evo maniac
    replied
    haha......reserves,a member who does web /software design says FW are going to fix it ! how long has it been!

    anyway, if you type something, right click and select all and copy, if [when it disappears] you post something like 'fucking forum!' post it again and when it posts click edit, right click in box and paste it.

    then sing click goes the shears while eating a chiko roll [spring roll in your case]

    https://surfers.se/firewire-pre-order-2017

    here are some dims, you would be familiar with swedish [pastries?]

    Leave a comment:


  • cuttlefish
    replied
    Hey Keith,
    forum ate my post again...unapproved it said. Curse you forum software.

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  • cuttlefish
    replied
    Originally posted by Freshiedude View Post
    Hey Pete thought you might get another 6'2 as it was one of your favourite boards. Hey looking at the Chum Lee either in a 5'11 or 6'1 can't decide which size I would go. What size would u get as we ride similar volumes in the past.
    G'day Justin,
    I'm a bit out of touch...where's the Chum lee dims?

    Leave a comment:


  • evo maniac
    replied
    Originally posted by cuttlefish View Post
    I have been quite the board slut.
    4 board quiver now.
    Rusty surftech happy shovel 6'6"
    Firewire TT potatonator 6'8"
    Woosley V quad 7'6"
    Modern blackhawk 8'
    If you ever see a Modern blackhawk 8'er for sale buy it. Shape by Al Merrick. Best gunny/massive shortboard shape ever for 3' plus waves. A mate who rides the same kind of boards as I bought one too. He's the biggest board whore bar none buying and selling boards more than some change their underwear but the blackhawk is his keeper. Chunky Granite bay and it commands the line up.
    haha, i was always amazed how tolerant your wife was of your board fetish! You must have so much room now in your house/garage/shed you dont know what to do with it.
    I am also struck by the diversity of your boards, which in some ways must be a product of the many moods of the waves in your area. I thought you said the waves have been crap, i saw some heaving sandbar peaks on coastalwatch [photos] the other day on the sunshine coast.
    That Beach beat surf shop is a cracker, no wonder you had so many boards! They are always selling something cheap on gumtree.
    8 footer maybe when im 65.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Freshiedude
    replied
    Hey Pete thought you might get another 6'2 as it was one of your favourite boards. Hey looking at the Chum Lee either in a 5'11 or 6'1 can't decide which size I would go. What size would u get as we ride similar volumes in the past.

    Leave a comment:


  • apache
    replied
    Looks good!!
    In that fin size with futures i only have a pair of shapers s9s. But I have a set of MR twins fcs1. Reminds me of trying out those bigger things in summer in smaller waves (to avoid sticking too much on conventions...). Hope the waves are up!

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  • cuttlefish
    replied
    The TT with Futures AMTs and a Josh Kerr 3d dimpled trailer.

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  • cuttlefish
    replied
    I have been quite the board slut.
    4 board quiver now.
    Rusty surftech happy shovel 6'6"
    Firewire TT potatonator 6'8"
    Woosley V quad 7'6"
    Modern blackhawk 8'
    If you ever see a Modern blackhawk 8'er for sale buy it. Shape by Al Merrick. Best gunny/massive shortboard shape ever for 3' plus waves. A mate who rides the same kind of boards as I bought one too. He's the biggest board whore bar none buying and selling boards more than some change their underwear but the blackhawk is his keeper. Chunky Granite bay and it commands the line up.

    Leave a comment:


  • evo maniac
    replied
    haha, yeah, you will lose your massive performance and wave catching advantage!
    I have just been looking at the addvance and greedy beaver online as i was trying to find the litreage of a 6'8 PN, 53.....my my.
    But you look at all the other craft [canoes] out there and wonder why they ride those huge logs....
    I did ask that question on Sea Breeze once and got shot down. Predictably.
    The big addvance or GB wont have the same performance as the nator or spit for that matter, tail shape of both is key, as is the spine/double conc of the pn.
    I like the double rail of the spit in the tail as well.
    Yes, you have had a few surfboards in your time, haha

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  • cuttlefish
    replied
    We should be keeping this our little (large) secret...thing is I've surfed sweet potatoes in 5'8", 5'10", 6' and bakeds in 5'9" and 5'11" then addvances in 6'6", 6'8" and 7'6". An activator in 6'11" as well as dominators 6'4" and 6'6". Nano in 6'2" and vanguard in 6". Test ridden the Submoon in 7'6" and 7" (if memory serves) as well as my all time favourite potatonator 6'2" and then the 6'4". So I've had a lot of experience with plenty of foam and the way they handle. As well I've tried a multitude of radical different fins and fin combinations.
    In amongst all this I've ridden all lengths of boards and most types from 4'2"s to 10'ers. McCoys, bonzers, fish, singles, twins, quads, no fins, in many different constructions.
    After all this I can safely say that thinking outside the box and not sticking to narrow performance accepted litreages was the best thing I ever did for my surfing.
    Last edited by cuttlefish; 04-24-2017, 09:55 PM.

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  • evo maniac
    replied
    Haha, and you didnt mow anyone down with your small arms destroyer!
    I have experimented also with the oversize mid length short/longboard with my 6'8 spitfire, and have had some hits and misses, but mainly hits since i swapped out the large plastic fins for the medium FireWire bamboo carbons. I found that i did not need lots of hold and drive in flat waves because it had so much natural momentum with its width and thickness. With smaller stiffer fins i was able to go rail to rail easier and it felt faster. You will have fun changing up fins in yours, as i heard a rumour you have one or 2 sets of fins to try out! I could imagine a 5 fin set up being fun.
    Its great to experiment in using boards outside their intended purpose, and it is also a bonus that FW produce such boards for older guys.

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